You'd be surprised.

Monday, April 18, 2005


I was having a discussion with a good friend of mine about employer expectations. Maybe what I am about to say will seem familiar to you. When an employer gets a new employee, in my experience, they typically monitor the performance of this employee for a good 6 months until that noobie establishes a pattern. Once that pattern, which we will call "job performance," is established, the employer holds that noobie to the now expected level "job performance."

In example: Lets see noobie A and noobie B start working on the same day. Noobie A shows up in the proper uniform at the proper time, every day. He works diligently, giving 100% no matter what. His productivity is high, and his expertise grows with experience. This guy is a model employee (or soldier if you prefer.) We will even go so far as to say he tries to embrace the Army Values LDRSHIP (loyalty, duty , respect, selfless-service, honor, integrity, personal courage) in all aspects of his life. Sometimes he works later than everyone else, sometimes he comes in on weekends, but he is always dependable and always meets the expectations of being a professional. He is an employee that is dependable, professional, reliable, and consistant.

Noobie B usually shows up on time, and usually has the right uniform on. His job performance is ok. He can get the job done, but may take a little longer than desired. He occasionally argues with his supervisors, and often stomps around loudly speaking profanities. He drinks heavily, and his physical fitness is lacking. He takes lots of breaks, and usually tries to slip out of doing any actual work. He has established a pattern. His employer now expects this type of behavior from him. No big deal right? Wrong.

Now, when noobie B improves job performance, or any aspect of himself, he is highly praised. Let's just say that noobie A is 100% of what an employer wants in a worker. Noobie B is 60%. Lately noobie B has been improving his work ethic, based on incentive presented by the employer. Noobie B now performs at 70% and is now highly praised. Maybe even rewarded. Noobie A meanwhile is still doing 100%, and still getting no response from the employer. In fact, when job performance slips 10% due to extraneous reasons (depression, maybe), noobie A is chastised and punished. Noobie B continues to be rewarded for mediocre performance, and noobie A continues to be punished.

So, aside from having good work ethic for one's self, why should anyone have good work ethic?

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -